SprinkleBakes.com

Crackling Circuit Board Chocolate Pops


These circuit board lollipops make cute edible gifts for the tech-savvy people in your life. Circuit boards have tracks that conduct electricity, so I thought it would be neat for these treats to fizz and crackle when you eat them. What makes this possible? You might have guessed Pop Rocks, which is mostly correct. I used plain carbonated candy, which is essentially the same thing except that it's not fruit flavored and it seems to have an extra ounce of popping power.


There are only two ingredients used to make the base lollipop recipe. The primary element is chocolate, so I think it's important to use something a little nicer than chocolate chips. I love TCHO dark chocolate because it's so smooth and it's Fair Trade certified to boot. The second ingredient, as mentioned earlier, is unflavored carbonated candy, which can be ordered online. Pop Rocks are widely available and work well in chocolate, so they can be used instead.

The circuit board pattern is fairly easy to make thanks to a stencil I found at the craft store. Michael's carries the stencil, but you can also order it here. You'll need green fondant, gold lustre dust (a staple in my decorator box!) and some art brushes. Below I'll show you how to make your own edible circuit board!

  1. First, knead well 1/2 cup of fondant until non-sticky and pliable. Knead in some confectioner's sugar if the fondant is too sticky.
  2. Place a small amount of gold lustre dust on a plate and dilute to a thin watery paint consistency with drops of clear extract or vodka.
  3. Roll the fondant between two pieces of parchment paper to 1/4-inch thickness. Let it stand until the surface dries a bit, about 2 minutes. Place the stencil on top.
  4. You can use blue painter's tape to hold each side of the stencil down (a tip from pastry school!) just be sure the fondant's surface is completely dry before you add the tape. Use a sponge to dab the thinned paint over the stencil. Don't drag or wipe the sponge over the surface -dot,dot,dot it onto the surface. You should be able to see a light shimmer from the luster dust paint in the crevices. Inspect the stencil thoroughly to make sure you didn't miss any spots.
  5. The paint that doesn't get into the stencil's crevices will bead up on the plastic. Use a paper towel to wipe off the excess moisture.
  6. Pour gold luster dust into a small bowl.
  7. Load a dry brush (large, 1-inch flat head or similar) with the dry powder
  8. Keep the brush flat as you brush the dry luster dust into the open stencil areas. The moisture added previously will help catch the luster dust in the grooves. Re-load brush with powder as needed. Let stand 2-3 minutes before using a paper towel to wipe off excess luster dust from the stencil.
  9. Pull the stencil away very slowly to reveal the design. Let stand until completely dry, about 15 minutes.

Now you're ready to decorate the lollipops with the fondant. You can use any shape lollipop mold you wish, but I used a heart mold because Valentine's Day is tomorrow! I had a heart cookie cutter that was a near match size-wise (the largest in this set) so I used it to cut the fondant. Lightly brush a little water on the underside of the fondant cut-out and then center it onto a chocolate pop.


I bagged the pops in cellophane and used cable ties as closures because they are vaguely computer-themed. My husband is a computer programmer and he's always using these to tidy up messy looking computer cables. Gold twist ties would also look nice.

I suppose you could add cute tags to these lovey pops with a saying like "Valentine, you short circuit my heart." but I believe that is a real medical condition so I am reluctant to suggest it - but you get the idea! Someone smarter than I am will come up with a better line.


I adore dark chocolate so that's what I used for my pops, but you could use milk or white chocolate if you prefer. These are so fun to eat because they pop and fizz like crazy!

Many of the specialty items I used can be found at local craft stores, but I'm including a short list of shopping links for your convenience.

Circuit Board Stencil
Gold lustre dust
Satin Ice green fondant
Large heart lollipop mold
8-inch lollipop sticks
Heart cookie cutter
Art sponges and brushes
Carbonated candy or Pop Rocks


Carbonated Chocolate Lollipops
Yields about 16 standard-sized pops or 8 jumbo pops

Special Equipment
Lollipop molds (I used 4.5-inch heart molds)
Lollipop sticks
Disposable piping bag
Cellophane wrappers with twist ties (or cable ties)

Ingredients
12 ounces quality chocolate, chopped fine
1/3 cup (about 3 oz.) carbonated sugar (I used unflavored Culinary Crystals, but flavored Pop Rocks candy will work, too!)

Have the ungreased lollipop molds prepped with lollipop sticks and place them close to your work station to receive the melted chocolate. Place a disposable piping bag in a tall glass or plastic tumbler and fold the top of the bag back so that the glass holds the bag open.

Place the chocolate in a microwave safe bowl and heat in the microwave at 100% power at 30 second intervals until the mixture can be stirred smooth (about 1 minute). Stir in the carbonated sugar (expect some popping with this addition). Transfer the chocolate to the piping bag. Snip the end of the bag with scissors and pipe the chocolate into the lollipop cavities.

Place the lollipops in the freezer until set. Pop them out and decorate as desired. Allow the pops to come to room temperature before wrapping them.

For the circuit board décor
1/2 lb. Satin Ice green fondant
Circuit Board Stencil
Gold lustre dust
Art sponges and brushes
Clear extract or rum
4-inch heart cookie cutter

Please see blog post for the picture tutorial.
First, knead well 1/2 cup of the fondant until non-sticky and pliable. Knead in some confectioner's sugar if the fondant is too sticky.
Place a small amount of gold lustre dust on a plate and dilute to a thin watery paint consistency with drops of clear extract or vodka.
Roll the fondant between two pieces of parchment paper to 1/4-inch thickness. Let it stand until the surface dries a bit, about 2 minutes. Place the stencil on top.
You can use blue painter's tape to hold each side of the stencil down (a tip from pastry school!) just be sure the fondant's surface is completely dry before you add the tape. Use a sponge to dab the thinned paint over the stencil. Don't drag or wipe the sponge over the surface -dot,dot,dot it onto the surface. You should be able to see a light shimmer from the luster dust paint in the stencil’s crevices. Inspect the stencil thoroughly to make sure you didn't miss any spots.
The paint that doesn't get into the stencil's crevices will bead up on the plastic. Use a paper towel to wipe off the excess moisture.
Pour gold luster dust into a small bowl. Load a dry brush (large, 1-inch flat head or similar) with the dry powder Keep the brush flat as you brush the dry luster dust into the open stencil areas. The moisture added previously will help catch the luster dust in the grooves. Re-load brush with powder as needed. Let stand 2-3 minutes before using a paper towel to wipe off excess luster dust from the stencil.
Pull the stencil away very slowly to reveal the design. Let stand until completely dry, about 15 minutes. Use the heart cookie cutter to cut as many hearts as possible from the fondant. Brush the underside of the fondant with a little water and center the fondant hearts onto the pops.
Repeat process with remaining fondant and heart pops.
Place pops in cellophane bags and close with twist ties or cable ties.

Note: These chocolate pops are not tempered, so I recommend storing them in the refrigerator for longevity. Overheated chocolate will bloom (become chalky white) on the outside. If your microwave is prone to over-heating, then add 2 tablespoons of vegetable shortening (Crisco) to the chocolate as you melt it. This will help keep the chocolate looking beautiful and doesn’t affect the flavor.


link Crackling Circuit Board Chocolate Pops By Published: Crackling Circuit Board Chocolate Pops Recipe



4 comments :

  1. omggg stop. My husband would die if I made these for him!! Definitely pinning and planning to attempt in the future :)

    Sues

    ReplyDelete
  2. These are so gorgeous! I don't love the taste of fondant...do you think I could get the same color effect with green candy melts? Just pouring inside a cookie cutter over the cookie and then paiting after they dry?

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's such a perfect Silicon Valley Valentine!
    kari
    http://sweetteasweetie.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looove this idea! :) They look so pretty! :) Happy Valentine's Day!

    ReplyDelete

Privacy Policy