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Carbonated Chocolate Lollipops



Today I have lots of cool things to tell you about!

First of all, check out these fizzy-crackling carbonated lollipops. I made them for an art reception happening this weekend.

Second - hey! I'm having an art reception this weekend!

If you're local to Knoxville then I'd love, love, LOVE for you to stop by. I'll be showing some of my food photography on the walls of CBI (a fancy interiors shop) and I'll also have a few books on hand for purchase. If you already have my book and would like for me to sign it, then bring it on over! There will be snacks, drinks and sweets - namely these carbonated lollies. Check out the invite below for details.



This is an easy treat to whip up when you're planning an event - and they're fun too! I love to incorporate the element of surprise in sweets, and these popping lollies will certainly garner some smiles. I bought some unflavored carbonated sugar (found here) for this project, but you can also use Pop Rocks candy, which is easily found at most US grocery stores.

I also dressed these lollies up in some cocoa butter-based chocolate velvet spray. You may remember when I used it on these caramel black pepper volcanoes. You can find the spray here if you're interested in purchasing some. Luster dust brushed over the chocolate pops is a pretty decor too, and much less expensive than the velvet spray.


One recipe will yield about 16 lollipops, and since most lollipop molds only have 6 to 8 cavities, be sure to have more than one lollipop mold ready to hand.


Carbonated Chocolate Lollipops
Yields: 16 lollipops
Author: Heather Baird

Special Equipment
Lollipop molds
Lollipop sticks
Disposable plastic piping bag
Lollipop wrappers with twist ties
Chocolate velvet spray or luster dust optional

Ingredients
12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
3 tablespoons vegetable shortening
1/4 cup carbonated sugar (I used unflavored Culinary Crystals, but flavored Pop Rocks candy will work, too!)

Have the ungreased lollipop molds prepped with lollipop sticks and place them close to your work station to receive the melted chocolate. Place a disposable piping bag in a tall glass or plastic tumbler and fold the top of the bag back so that the glass holds the bag open.

Place the chocolate and shortening in a microwave safe bowl and heat in the microwave at 100% power at 30 second intervals until the mixture can be stirred smooth (about 1 minute). Stir in the carbonated sugar (expect some popping with this addition). Transfer the chocolate to the piping bag. Snip the end of the bag with scissors and pipe the chocolate into the lollipop cavities.

Place the lollipops in the freezer until set. Pop them out and decorate as desired. If using velvet spray, spray the lollipops directly after removing them from the freezer. If using luster dust, allow the pops to come to room temperature before decorating.

Allow the pops to come to room temperature before wrapping them.



link Carbonated Chocolate Lollipops By Published: Carbonated Chocolate Lollipops Recipe


12 comments :

  1. You have the best imagination, Heather.
    My li'l sweetheart will love this. I'll have to try to make them for her.

    Wish I could visit you. xo

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  2. Wow those are so pretty! love the second photograph, so beautiful :)

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  3. Wonderful!

    http://beautyfollower.blogspot.gr

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  4. Soooo beautiful Heather! Just absolutely the most creative mind xx

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  5. Excellentt........
    http://thatsecretingredient.com/

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  6. These are so cute! Chocolate lollipops sound delicious!

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  7. I wish I'm near your town to come and visit, Good Luck & of course your imagination and art is unbelievable
    Thanks C

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  8. Hi! I really like your blog! May I link to you on my blog?

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  9. Replies
    1. Popping sugar, or also called carbonated sugar or pop rocks candy, consists of sugar bits containing carbon dioxide. As the sugar melts in the mouth, the carbon dioxide is released, producing a fizzy feeling on the tongue and a popping and sizzling sound. Carbon dioxide is also the gas used in carbonated beverages.

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