SprinkleBakes.com

Spring Flower Lollipops


Happy first day of spring!  To celebrate I've made a special treat for you with colorful spring flowers.

I've been enamored with edible flowers ever since making candied rose petals earlier this year. By doing a little research (that includes taste-testing) I've found that just because a flower is non-poisonous, doesn't mean it is also yummy.  That's why I'm sharing my list of favorite edible flowers.  They are all fairly well-known (easy to find) and add a certain something when used sparingly in dessert.
  • Basil 
  • Chamomile
  • Hibiscus (you can also find these at specialty markets -or online -packed in syrup!)
  • Johnny-jump-ups 
  • Lavender
  • Marigolds
  • Pansies 
  • Roses
  • Violas 
  • Violets
Common sense note:  Eat only those flowers you are positive you can identify.  Use organic, pesticide-free plants from nurseries and herb shops that offer organically grown flowers; pick them from a trusted friend's organic garden or your own.

I made these without the use of a lollipop mold, and if you make these - do yourself a favor and buy an inexpensive round lollipop mold.  I used this method on the King Arthur Flour blog, and although it was successful, it was also messy and I didn't feel comfortable re-using my powdered sugar.  I also had to rinse the powdered sugar away under a thin stream of water in order to see the flower. Using a lollipop mold would have made the whole endeavor much more enjoyable, but if you don't have access to candy molds - the powdered sugar method works in a pinch!  Here's a little peek at the process.

[1] Make an indention in powdered sugar with a small flat-bottomed object. [2] Pour hot candy in the indentation; press a clean, fresh flower face-down into the hot candy. [3] Quickly cover flower with more hot candy.  Let stand until candy hardens.

Edit 3/28/12:  Check out this cute version using decorative quins (sprinkles) by Karen at Trilogy Edibles!

Spring Flower Lollipops 
Hard candy recipe from the SprinkleBakes baking book!
Yield: 10 lollipops                                                                                                  [click for printable recipe]                                  

2 cups sugar
2/3 cup corn syrup
2/3 cup water
1 dram bottle candy flavoring oil (such as LorAnn, I used Blackberry)
Violet gel food coloring 
10 organic whole voila flower heads or pansy petals, washed and patted dry
10 lollipop sticks
  1. If you are using a lollipop mold (recommended), lightly grease it with cooking spray.  If you are not using a mold, pour 2 cups of powdered sugar into a baking pan with a lip.  Create indentations with the bottom of a glass or other flat-bottomed object. Set aside.
  2. Stir together the sugar, corn syrup and water in a small saucepan and clip a candy thermometer to the side of the pan.
  3. Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat.  Continue to heat without stirring until the bubbling mixture reaches the hard-crack stage (302 degrees F). Remove pan from heat.
  4. Stir in flavoring oil and a small amount of gel food coloring. Be extra careful because the mixture will bubble and sputter with these additions.
  5. When the mixture has stopped bubbling, drop it into molds by the spoonfuls (or powdered sugar indentations) using a metal spoon. Carefully place a viola flower head or petal face down on the hot candy. Use the end of a lollipop stick to slightly press it into the candy.  Quickly pour just enough hot candy over the flower head or petal to cover the backside, encasing it completely in the candy.  Place a lollipop stick in the candy and turn 1/2 turn.  Allow the candy to harden, then remove from molds.  If using powdered sugar to mold, you may choose to rinse off the excess sugar under a thin stream of warm water - either way, the flower will become more visible once the lollipop is being enjoyed.

Note: Make sure the mold you use is large enough to accommodate the size of the flowers and petals you are using.

link Spring Flower Lollipops By Published: Spring Flower Lollipops Recipe



95 comments :

  1. so pretty! i can see why you're enamored by them

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  2. Awww, those looks so pretty and delicate!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  3. Oh good golly those are lovely. I've gotta try my hand at these.

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  4. These are a work of art...wow!! Seriously, so beautiful!!!

    Happy Spring!

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  5. Its looks so pretty and fragile. You are SO talented! Its the perfect treat for the beginning of spring. Thanks for another great post! :) Oh, and what was the worst flower you tried? (just curious) :D

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  6. Dandelions! SO bitter! The buds are much milder. I would not recommend eating a mature, fully bloomed dandelion.

    :)

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  7. These are so lovely! I can see them for bridal showers and weddings too, great idea!

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  8. These are so incredibly beautiful. I think these will be the perfect present for my mom's birthday. :D

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  9. This is a wonderful idea, and the list of flowers is very helpful!

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  10. This is a gorgeous lollipop! I made some candied viola and got funny looks. Most people aren't up in edible flowers. Love it!

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  11. You always amaze me. These are absolutely stunning!

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  12. You must have been so excited to post these - they're so beautiful!

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  13. These are so cute, yet very elegant. Pinning!!

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  14. These are so pretty, almost too pretty to eat!

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  15. The perfect spring treat. One stunning lollipop!

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  16. How long would these last? I was thinking of making some for a party in July, but the violets are blooming now! (The birthday girl is named Violet ;) )

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  17. So pretty! Thank you for the list of edible flowers...very helpful as was the tutorial.

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  18. Never have I wanted to eat a flower in my life than I have now. These looks absolutely adorable! Happy Spring! :D

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  19. OOOOOH!! De verdad, esto es realmente precioso, adoro, me encantan, son mis preferidas,las flores de Pensamientos.
    Mis felicitaciones.

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  20. Simply stunning - I need to get a new sugar thermometer I think!

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  21. Such an original idea! Love these delicate flowers!

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  22. Beautiful, Heather! You are so talented!

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  23. Spring on a lollipop stick! Gorgeous, Heather! Besides eating these, I'd love to have them around for preserving spring...much better than flowers pressed in a book:)

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  24. wow! these are so pretty - clever lady ;)
    I am hosting a super fun $25 giveaway on my blog and I would love to have you stop by and enter http://the-still-waters.blogspot.com/2012/03/25-sneakpeeq-giveaway.html

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  25. Are very nice and original, had not seen before. A greeting from Spain

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  26. These are so simple and looks sp pretty & delicious .... Loved them ......

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  27. Lovely. Wouldn't it be fun to pass these out for a bridal shower or have on the tables at a wedding!

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  28. What's neat is Daylily petals are also edible!
    But these are fantastic and super easy to make! I would love to try out a savory style pop using herbs instead of slowers... a nice lemon Thyme with a lemon pop. Mmmm...

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  29. You are so creative, I absolutely adore your blog!

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  30. I'm kind of speechless, Heather. Love. Love!

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  31. Thanks for sharing which flowers actually taste good. These are so beautiful, I wouldn't want to eat them!

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  32. I know I've told you numerous times before, but you are truly gifted. You do such beautiful work. I've never even heard of something like this, they are gorgeous! Plus, you are a nice person because you give the list of the best flowers to use. You are great!
    Best,
    Gloria
    P.S. My Mom's favorite flower was the pansy... so I immediately smiled when I saw this. :)

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  33. Congratulations, these are soooo gorgeous!

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  34. Que preciosidad, me encantan son maravillosos, me producen paz al mirarlos. Un beso

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  35. Beautiful!!! Must be candy in the air - lol. I just made homemade toostie rolls. I love making candy.

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  36. I believe you and I are on the same wavelength. I've been looking into suckers over the last couple of weeks. I love this idea and I was also looking into this method. It's harder to find simple round molds than I thought.

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  37. WOW - so beautiful. Thanks for posting.

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  38. So delicate! So Spring!! Ultra sophisticated.

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  39. Heather, these are so beautiful! I love edible flowers and the color purple! These came out so sweet and clean-looking. I am sharing, sharing, sharing....

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  40. Such a beautiful idea and ultra classic! Love, love, love!

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  41. Tu blog siempre me deja sin palabras pero la entrada de hoy es MARAVILLOSA!
    Besazos.

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  42. Found this via Pinterest and all I can say is what a wonderful idea! I love candied violas and violets and these take them to a whole new level. I am definitely going to make these when the flowers show themselves.

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  43. These just shout spring! So pretty :)

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  44. Wow, these are so beautiful! What a lovely gift idea!

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  45. The most elegant lolipops I've ever seen!

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  46. So pretty and delicate -- love them!

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  47. They're so very pretty and delicate! What a great wedding favor. I can see how the powdered sugar could be troublesome. Thanks for all of the tips!

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  48. The portrait of spring!
    Really Nice!
    Alice

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  49. I saw these on Pinterest and clicked over to find that it was your post!! These are tiny little works of art, I love that they are clear with the flowers as the star of the show. xoxo ~Lili

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  50. I. LOVE. THESE!
    I am sort of afraid of making hard candy, but these are such a beautiful idea - I think I'll venture into the territory. What a lovely gift a bouquet of these would make!

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  51. My inner girl child is squealing with excitement over these. Just saying. They are like the epitome of my little girl dreams.

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  52. So lovely to look at and what a creative idea!!!!!!!

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  53. Heather these are so awesome! I made a version today for tomorrow's Treat Day Wednesday for my girls. I see lots of different variations in my future. Thank you for the inspiration!

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  54. These are just too gorgeous for words. They make the most delightful gift.
    I'm inspired.

    Thanks for sharing.

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  55. Hey! I love this and I'm most definitely gonna try them. I was just wondering what kind of violas did you use? I don't know much about plants and I see there are quite a number of violas around :)

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  56. Do you have to use gel food coloring?
    Thanks, Ali

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  57. My first lollipops an they were awesome! I loved the power sugar method an I used the cap from my corn syrup as the molds it was perfect. An since I could find the blackberry flavor I used raspberry yummy(: thanks

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  58. Sorry for typo's Powder an couldn't lol!! Can't wait to use my edible flowers from my garden (:

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  59. I tried this and the johhny-jump-ups shriveled and curled when I covered them with the hot candy. What did you do to prevent this?

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  60. Hi natphie! Sorry for the late reply - here is my suggestion.

    Flowers: allow the candy mixture to stop bubbling in the saucepan before spooning it into candy molds/sugar molds. After spooning the candy in, let the candy circles stand for a couple of minutes before placing the flowers on top. A visual cue - when you place the flower on top, it should rest on the surface and be a little resistant to being pushed into the candy with a skewer or spoon handle.
    This recipe may take a couple of tries to get right, but once you find the correct timing, it gets easier.

    I'm awfully sorry the recipe didn't work out the first time. I know how frustrating that can be!

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  61. These are truly gorgeous, I am thinking of trying them for a tea party themed shower. How far in advance would it be ok to make these? Is a month too long?

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  62. Heather, I am attempting this right now and my sugar has gone a golden caramel color...which I expected but was half hoping it would stay a lovely clear-ish complexion. Am I doing something wrong...is my heat too high?

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  63. ok...it's now almost black...I think I've burnt it.

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  64. Hey Kristen! Sorry you are having trouble. I know what that's like - very frustrating!

    Candy will look and taste burned when it is heated past the hard crack stage. I suggest you check the accuracy of your thermometer. You can do this by placing it in water and bringing the water to a boil. The thermometer should read 212° F {100° C.}; if the reading is higher or lower, take the difference into account when testing the temperature of your sugar syrup.

    I really hope this helps! Best of luck!

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  65. you are a wonderful help!! My thermometer is definitely a dud. I tried again and eyeballed the sugar and took it off when it just barely began to develop a golden hue. I was making lemon lavender lollies so I didn't mind a bit of color - saved me from having to add food coloring. They turned out! Can you recommend a candy thermometer brand? I tried a candy thermometer and then tried my meat thermometer and neither were helpful!

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  66. OMG those look amazing! I love this idea so much that I am going to use it to make favors for the guests at my wedding later this year (I will buy a lollipop mold, thank you for the tip!). Your blog is brilliant and I am thoroughly enjoying diving back into older and older posts. :)

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  67. Hello! I LOVE the look of these and want them as favours for my wedding, as my colours are purple and yellow, the violas are perfect! I bought LorAnn flavouring oil in grape and it coloured my candy too much with the gel colouring so the flowers could not be seen! I tried again without adding the food colouring, but it still was not a clear lollipop, in fact, it became a brownish colour. Does the blackberry flavouring oil not have any colouring? I am disappointed and I'm debating making them without added flavouring to see if I can get the pale violet colour you have... suggestions?? Thank you!

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  68. Meaghan,

    Sounds like your thermometer is sightly off, and making your candy over-brown. The hot candy should be clear. You can check your candy thermometer accuracy by placing it in water and bringing the water to a boil. The thermometer should read 212° F {100° C.}; if the reading is higher or lower, take the difference into account when testing the temperature of your sugar syrup.

    You'll see here that the blackberry flavoring oil is clear. I'd suggest using a clear oil.

    https://www.lorannoils.com/p-8284-blackberry-flavor.asp

    - and use just a dab of food coloring, just a little bit on the end of a toothpick.

    Here's some new info I have from making them recently: To be able to clearly see the flowers you'll need to run the lollipops under a stream of water (warm water is best) and let them dry for a few hours - perhaps even a couple of days- before you wrap them for favors. I'd suggest using wooden lollipop sticks because the paper ones are prone to peel when dampened.

    Best of luck, and congratulations on your impending nuptials!

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  69. Wow these look beautiful! I saw pics in the July issue of Olive magazine and immediately came to the website. I can't wait to tryy hand at these

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  70. I'm getting married next May at a rose garden. I'm definitely going to try to make these with rose petals. Thanks for this beautiful idea! :)

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  71. Very beautiful and sweet! Just perfect gift for any events specially wedding events.

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  72. This is wonderful idea and list of flowers is so pretty...thanks for sharing.
    Flower delivery Pakistan

    Flower delivery Pakistan

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  73. Gorgeous! I'm amazed that the hot candy doesn't discolor the flower or simply burn it to a crisp.

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  74. Wow! They will make a great Easter gift for my kinder students - thanks for the inspiration and the great tutorial!

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  75. Nasturtiums would be gorgeous too (I use them in salads too). They come in a wide array of colors!! These are just beautiful - what a great idea!!

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  76. Dear Heather, your treats make me happy! I am also trained in Fine Arts and putting my creativity in blogging about what kids learn through food. I used one of your pictures in my recent post about spring, I hope you don't mind.
    www.sillyapron.wordpress.com

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  77. Hi, I'm making these for a bridal shower in September! Do you think they will be okay to make a few weeks ahead of time? ...since the flower is fully covered with candy.
    Thanks, Kate

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  78. Hi there-
    I made these, and mine won't set. What am I doing wrong?

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  79. Hi I was wondering what the timeline is for making these? How long can they be made in advance? How long do they keep? What should they be wrapped in for a dessert display/ what kind of bags typical candy bags ? And how do you store them?

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  80. Hi Alex,

    Make them no more than two or three days in advance. I'd recommend leaving them unwrapped until the day of the event, and then wrap them in clear cellophane (you can get the clear candy bags at a craft store). Keep them at room temperature, and it's best to not make them on a humid day.

    I hope this helps!

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  81. Omg These are so beautiful. I own a flower shop / nursery and we have over 10.000 Violas and Violets since we grow them. But I never thought about making candy out of them; something that would really worth trying ;)

    Greeting from germany

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  82. :3 Hello~
    I just wanted to say that i most definitely wanted to venture into the land of lollipops and hard candy but i never had the desire to as much as now. Seeing your lollipops made me instantly think of tea parties and since i was planning on hosting a tea party (possibly for a best friend of mine, shes constantly telling me how its her dream to have one lol) i think that gave me the final push to finally venture into candy making.

    I normally just make pastries, cakes, and chocolates (i love working with chocolate) and i kept remembering about hard candy and the nightmares of burns from culinary arts classes I've taken in the past ^^;
    Though i never personally screwed up on making caramels and caramel sauces back then i never wanted to try my hand at lollipops and candy drops for those reasons.

    My one wonder always was about the thermometers, and i never tried making any form of molten sugar mixtures before with an IR thermometer but i hope it works.
    My father had purchased an IR thermometer last year and gave it to me and it has been a wonderful piece to add to my collection of cooking tools, i just don't know how accurate it may play in something as temperamental as hard candies.
    Well here's to hoping it comes out as a success!

    Thank you for your wonderful blog, it has been like walking through an art museum of food.
    I wish you all the best, God bless~ :3

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